Related Links (Courtroom Interpreter Resources for Judges and Attorneys)

The resource links listed below are divided into the following 3 categories:
- Federal and State Court Requirements
- Interpreter Training and Certification
- Access to Justice Initiatives

Federal and State Court Requirements

1. Federal Court Interpreters - The use of competent federal court interpreters in proceedings involving speakers of languages other than English is critical to ensure that justice is carried out fairly for defendants and other stakeholders.

2. National Association of Judiciary Interpreters and Translators - The National Association of Judiciary Interpreters and Translators promotes quality standards in the field of legal interpreting and translating. Members play a critical role in ensuring due process, equal protection and equal access for non-English or limited English proficient (LEP) individuals who interact with the judicial system.

Interpreter Training and Certification

1. American Association of Language Specialists

2. American Translators Association - The mission of ATA is to benefit translators and interpreters by promoting recognition of their societal and commercial value,
facilitating communication among all its members, establishing standards of competence and ethics, and educating both its members and the public.

3. CCIO - Community & Court Interpreters of the Ohio Valley - CCIO is a non-profit professional association of community and court interpreters joined by one same principle: to improve as professionals and help further our profession as a whole, as we positively impact the quality of interpreting in Ohio and nearby states.

4. FCICE - Federal Court Interpreter Certification Examination Program - The FCICE program was created and implemented in direct response to the Court Interpreters Act of 1978. Since 1980, the mission of the Federal Court Interpreter Certification Examination program (FCICE) has been to define criteria for certifying interpreters qualified to interpret in federal courts and to assist the Director of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts (AO) in maintaining a list of federally certified court interpreters.

5. OCRID - Ohio Chapter of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf - Fosters the relationships which further profession by providing opportunities for growth through development and support.

6. RID - Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf (How to Become an Interpreter) - RID is a national membership organization representing the professionals who facilitate communication between people who are deaf or hard of hearing and people who hear. Interpreters serve as professional communicators in a vast array of settings such as: churches, schools, courtrooms, hospitals and theaters, as well as on political grandstands and television.

7. NCSC - National Center for State Courts: Court Interpretation: Professional court interpreters are individuals who possess an educated, native-like mastery of both English and a second language; display wide general knowledge, characteristic of what a minimum of two years of general education at a college or university would
provide; and perform the three major types of court interpreting: sight translation, consecutive interpreting, and simultaneous interpreting. The NCSC provides resources to inspire and enable its members to promote equal access to justice in courts and tribunals by eliminating language barriers for persons with limited English proficiency.

Access to Justice Initiatives

1. CA Court System Professional Ethics and the Role of the Court Interpreter - CIP strives to ensure access to the courts for persons with limited
English proficiency or those who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, by developing programs and practices that enhance the quality of interpretation and increase the availability of qualified interpreters in the courts.

2. National Center for Interpretation - NCI strives to ensure the rights of people with limited English proficiency in the United States. They have trained and tested
thousands of interpreters and defined the field of court interpretation. Since 1979, they have have developed the finest court interpretation training program in the country, the Agnese Haury Institute, developed the model for interpreter certification.

3. National Center for State Courts (Consortium for Language Access in the Courts)- The Mission of the Consortium is to inspire and enable its members to promote equal access to justice in courts and tribunals by eliminating language barriers for persons with limited English proficiency.